We’re hiring a digital marketer!

We're hiring a digital marketer!

 

Story Shop is a Glasgow based creative PR and Marketing agency. We are a small team, finding big meaning in stories for brands we believe in. We want to tell stories in the most impactful way possible for those brands – that’s why we need you!

 

About the role

 

We’re looking for a Digital Marketer with 3+ years-experience to join our small team at Story Shop. Your primary role will be managing paid social media advertising for our clients as well as leading on Google Ads campaigns, reporting on web analytics, and looking for new ways for our clients to reach their customers through digital marketing.

 

You’ll be confident and competent managing various digital marketing platforms, setting up, managing, optimising, and reporting on various campaigns for several clients. Budget management will be a key element of your role.

 

Story Shop is a small team, so we all get involved in every stage of the creative process. You should be comfortable sharing thoughts on advertising strategy, and understand how this fits into the wider marketing needs for clients.  

 

We know that these platforms regularly change, so you should be comfortable staying up to date, and ahead of the curve, planning for platform/algorithm changes based on client needs.

 

About you

 

You should have experience working across multiple digital marketing platforms. You enjoy working with a small team, data driven and extremely organised. 

 

You:

·        Strong attention to detail 

·        Strong budget management skills

·        In-depth knowledge of various digital marketing strategies, objectives, and platforms

·        Eager to use more complex strategies within various platforms

 

Key platform competencies:

 

  • Facebook & Instagram, Business & Ads Manager
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Ads
  • Google Analytics

 

Preferred but not essential:

 

·        Experience with SEO

 

Reasons to become a Storyteller:

 

  • We want to change the world of work and will constantly strive to make Story Shop the best place to work possible
  • We realise being always on comes at a cost for creativity, productivity and happiness. You get what you celebrate, and we celebrate creativity, collaboration, honesty and enthusiasm, not presenteeism
  • We’ll learn constantly from these mistakes and always try to do what’s right by our team
  • You’ll always be able to challenge and execute your own judgement. If we’re hiring you, it’s because we believe in you, so we’ll trust you and listen to you
  • You’ll be part of a team that looks out for each other and is capable of achieving special things
  • We’re not sector specific – our clients work in every sector that interests us. The one thing they’ll always have in common is that we believe in what they’re doing
  • You’ll be free to do your best work and will never be pigeon-holed into one client, one industry or one specialty

 

If you really want to, you can read our tips about applying to Story Shop here.

Send your applications to hello@wearestoryshop.com.


Stories from Dreamland: What I’ve learnt about the ancient art of Storytelling

A little over three months ago, I applied for a job as a marketing and PR intern with both Story Shop and their client, Kelvinside Academy.  After finishing my third year of University studying PR, Marketing & Events I was looking to gain as much experience in communications as I could. It’s been a total whirlwind, and a brilliant experience working with the most welcoming and supportive team. Over the Summer I have learnt so much, and unexpectedly, much of it has been beyond the realms of marketing.

I’ve always had very vivid dreams and the night after accepting the job at Story Shop, I had one that I haven’t been able to forget throughout my internship.

Walking through a busy shopping centre past clothes shops and cosmetics shops, I came across a story shop. It didn’t sell TVs or lipsticks or the latest trendy trainers, it sold stories. It was the centre of a lot of attention, with a crowd of people gathered at the shop front. Inside it was bright and shimmering, as dreamt places often are. It felt like a funfair, with colours and laughter in every corner. Hues of pink covered the walls and there was a swimming pool in the corner.

As a group of people, we were led through the shop as if we were in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and you could feel the wonder in the room. There were different stalls for us to visit, and it was soon apparent that there was one for each client. You paid the cashier for a story and then, as if picking out names from a hat, they would reach into a glass bowl and pick out a little piece of paper. Then they told a story, us gripped to every word.  Listeners were left crying, laughing, thoughtful, and amused. Even though it was adults in the shop, it felt childlike and magical.

When I first walked into Story Shop’s actual office, I wasn’t surprised to find that it didn’t glow or have a swimming pool. But as the weeks went on what I did realise was that my dream summed up a lot about storytelling, and how innate it is to us.

We all want to hear stories that make us feel something, and as humans, our ability to communicate with each other is undoubtedly the reason our homo sapien ancestors grew to a population of over 7 billion. From cave stories and fairytales, all the way to infographics, Tik Toks, and even the Bible, we have always shared stories. Think about the poems we still celebrate 500 years later and the folk songs we all know well. We tell stories from cradle to grave, just swap bedtime stories with reading the news or celebrity gossip on your commute to work.

What they do at Story Shop is really no different. Before I started, the job title ‘Storyteller’ confused me, and I only had a vague idea of the kind of work I would be doing day-to-day.  My dream was very literal and obviously doesn’t reflect how much expertise and consideration goes into marketing and PR. But what I think it does reflect, is how intrinsic to society these jobs really are.

Over the summer I’ve learnt about so much more than how to optimise a blog for google or how to pitch a press release. My friends are amazed (and slightly concerned) by the number of niche facts I’ve shared in conversation, from edible seaweed to  video interviewing technology. I’ve learnt things about myself, but more importantly I’ve learnt more about the world we live in. I’ve learnt that being surrounded by creative people sparks creativity in yourself. I’ve learnt that working in an agency lets you work with people from every walk of life, in every type of occupation. It opens so many doors for connection and the network that you can build is really special.

As I write this now, on my penultimate day in the Story Shop office, I’ve come to realise that my dream three months ago about the glowing pink shop wasn’t really so far off the mark. The storytelling isn’t as transactional, and we don’t always realise when we’re being told one, but it’s always happening and always has been. It’s changed a wee bit over the years, but it’s still just as important a part of our society. Storytellers really are the right job title for the team at Story Shop, and I’m proud to have spent these past months learning with them. 


How your company should celebrate Pride in 7 easy steps

You want to show you’re an ally and celebrate Pride - but you don’t know what you can and can’t say these days? Not to worry, this blog will point your brand in the right direction so you can make a statement louder than the rainbow, literally! 

 

Make is all about your company

 

Pride is a momentous occasion for the queer community but more importantly, it gives your company a chance to show your support for the LGBTQ+ community and just how progressive you are. 

 

Remember to make it all about your company and how you love and support the community. We’ve all heard the story of Pride starting as a protest numerous times. But it’s not like that anymore, you can definitely make it a party. 

 

Pride month is in June, so you’ll want to focus your effort there

 

Since your company is so pro-LGBTQ, you’ll have probably dreamed up a campaign months in advance. Just in case you haven’t - don’t worry too much. The whole month of June is dedicated to Pride so you can probably leave it till late May to round up a few members of staff and think of something. 

 

Speaking of June, a whole month does seem a long time to dedicate to just one group of people, and things are great now, so after June is finished you can probably drop it till next year. 

 

Remember to turn your logo rainbow

 

Oh and you must remember to turn your logo rainbow - how else will people know you support gay people? Nobody will know more than you, but you might come up against some stigma because you made the brave decision to support people’s human rights and turn your fortune 500 company's logo rainbow. Not to worry, one of your juniors can look out for any negative comments and you can totally own those homophobes on Twitter! 

 

Omg, rainbows!

 

We’re preaching to the choir here, but we thought we’d just remind you that each colour of the rainbow flag stands for something deeply significant to the LGBTQ community. Don’t worry about the recently added blue, pink, white, brown and black stripes though - they’re just extras and they might spoil the aesthetic of your design.

There’s too many flags these days to keep up with, right? And let’s be honest - those rainbow colours can be a little garish. So if it clashes with your aesthetic, don’t be afraid to exchange them for something a little more muted.

 

Make sure you’re not wasting any of that campaign money

 

Pride month is a great time to raise money for charities that do important work to help the queer community. Don’t worry about paying any queer community members you consult with to create your campaign. 

 

Also, be sure to only donate to LGBTQ+ charities during June - they’ve got it made for the rest of the year after then. 

 

Speaking of money, what are you selling?

 

Whether it’s a tote or a T-shirt, you better be slapping a rainbow on something - bonus points if it’s only suitable for cis-white gay men. After all, that’s what Pride is all about. If you’re feeling really generous, you could even come up with a witty promo code to punt your Pride collection and consider it an act of charity. 

 

And finally, be sure to draft your self-congratulatory LinkedIn post about all of your hard work. 

 

Although you’ve already done enough, it’s important to speak out to let other companies know that they should be doing more to support the community during Pride month. We suggest an emotive LinkedIn post that’ll really do some numbers. 

 

Of course, after all this work, Pride month is coming to an end - so don’t forget to flip the switch and turn that logo back to regular colours before the shareholders have a heart attack. You’re a hero - take a day off will you? And start planning next year's kiki!

 

Okay, you can relax now - this post was written by a living, breathing gay person. 

 

Pride month is both joyful and exhausting. On the one hand, the sun is out, everything is covered in rainbows and for a brief moment - the world's attention is drawn to causes that actually matter to me and my community. On the other, it’s a month of seeing brands slap a rainbow on their website and post all over social media about Pride while lobbying governments in countries where it’s still illegal to be queer. Then there’s the inevitable, ‘why do you need a whole month’ discourse followed by, ‘when’s straight Pride?’ It’s a real mixed bag. 

 

As a ‘token gay’ employee at many previous workplaces, I’ve been the driving force behind one or two Pride campaigns, helping brands walk the tricky tightrope of being the ally they so badly want to be and one caption away from being cancelled. Along the way I’ve seen it all. 

 

‘Do we really need the ‘extra’ colours in the flag?’

‘Do you think they’d post for free?’ 

‘Katie, what’s a good charity we can donate to?’

‘Can we just say LGBT? The rest of the acronym is too confusing!’ 

 

Of course, I’m being facetious here in this blog - but don’t let that put you off participating in Pride month. As long as your intentions are genuine, you usually can’t go wrong.

If you’re at a total loss as to whether your campaign idea is a winner or completely tone deaf, perhaps keep your ear to the ground and donate the budget you would have spent to charity. Nobody will notice and you’ll have made a real difference. And there’s always next year!

 

Spotted a particularly cringeworthy corporate Pride take? We’d want to hear all about it. We’d love to talk shop over a virtual coffee. And for more Story Shop musings, you’d better sign up to our newsletter.


Buying A Car In 68 Easy Steps

Scarlett and I bought a new car this month.  

 

We not only share a car, but also a complete indifference about cars. We know nothing about them, apart from the fact that in this current stage of our life, owning a car does make things a little easier. 

 

Owning a business and having a child together, we try to draw clear lines to agree who’s responsible for what. Despite my complete lack of knowledge, this particular task was allotted to me.

 

I’ve owned four cars during my life -  a Toyota Yaris, a Volkswagen Polo, a Vauxhall Astra and a Jeep Renegade. As I’m not loyal to one brand and I have next to no knowledge about which car is “the best” in my price range, I’m a very impressionable buyer. 

 

My most recent car was bought completely on impulse - a Jeep Renegade purchased after a trip to America during which we were upgraded from our bargain bucket rental car to a Jeep Cherokee. I quite enjoyed driving it and I thought “Hey! I’m the type of guy who drives his Jeep on the highway!”

 

But the M8 ain’t the pacific coast highway. And the Jeep Renegade ain’t a great car - not my words, but the words of What Car Magazine.  

 

This time, I tried to become a little more informed and aimed to be a little less impulsive before taking the plunge.  Being the marketing professional I am, I began to list all the things that were influencing my decision as an uninformed, dispassionate consumer searching for an answer.

 

So here are the 68 things that influenced my purchase: 

 

  1. An email from Arnold Clark to remind me it was “time to change my Jeep Renegade”. 
  2. Watching Volvo ads at the start of The Undoing.
  3. Seeing the lovely family who live above us had just bought a Volvo.
  4. Reading an article in Monocle Magazine about Volvo’s turnaround.
  5. Reading about Volvo’s commitment to safety.
  6. Remembering that the cool couple who own an amazing boutique BnB we visited also drove a Volvo. 
  7. Pontificating about how impressive it was that Volvo had transformed its reputation from a car for Dire Straits’ listening, Barley Sugar eating boring middle-aged men to the car driven by cool entrepreneurs like I hoped people would see us as. 
  8. Being relentlessly served ads by Volvo on Instagram.
  9. A scroll through Volvo’s Instagram grid to see my options.
  10. Looking up the prices for a Volvo and seeing a Volvo was out of our price range.
  11. Reading a review about the Volvo that we could potentially stretch to which pointed out the Volvo we wanted was flawed in areas I barely understood.
  12. Our friends buying a Skoda Kodiaq, which looked nice. 
  13. Jeremy Clarkson reviewing the Skoda Kodiaq positively in The Sunday Times Magazine (there’s probably not many things that Jeremy Clarkson and I are simpatico on, and I’m not a regular reader of his columns, but if there’s one thing I’ll bow to him on, it’s cars).
  14. The Skoda adverts with the entire SUV range swirling about in the dirt.
  15. The elusive Skoda salesman who went against type and refused to return my calls.
  16. PPC advertising.
  17. Pontificating about how Skoda had stuck to its guns and kept its brand name despite being the butt of jokes for how terrible the cars were when I was younger.
  18. Being worried that if I drove a Skoda people might get in thinking I was their Uber Driver.
  19. Seeing the Skoda parked outside my local Sainsbury’s and peering in every time I walked past. 
  20. Frustration towards the Skoda salesman who assured me that he was “Sorry Mr Hollerin but we’ll get that price sent by the end of the day” (he didn’t).
  21. Hearing our friends raving about their new Skoda Kodiaq.
  22. Being pied by Skoda after asking to speak to another salesman.
  23. Being tempted by the Karoq which was smaller, but cheaper.
  24. Still being unable to speak to anyone at Skoda.
  25. Watching Larry David driving the BMWi electric car in Curb Your Enthusiasm.
  26. The reality of living in a flat so being unable to install a charging unit.
  27. Scarlett saying “we’re not buying a car just because it’s what Larry David drives.”
  28. Realising that the BMWi was too small for a pram.
  29. Watching Larry David drive a Toyota Prius in the early episodes of Curb Your Enthusiasm. 
  30. The very friendly and helpful salesman at the Toyota Arnold Clark in Linwood.
  31. The Toyota RAV4 being a car big enough for a pram. 
  32. Our friends in America driving a Toyota RAV4 which they were very fond of. 
  33. Toyota’s PPC advertising.
  34. My dad sending me a good deal on a Nissan Quashqai. 
  35. Scarlett not liking the shape of the Nissan Quashquai.
  36. Wanting to go against the grain and being encouraged by not seeing many RAV4s about the streets.
  37. The fact it was a hybrid allowed us to get a step closer to an electric car.
  38. Being offered a really, really good deal on the Toyota RAV4.
  39. Both our dads and a friend agreeing it was a really, really good deal when we sent it to them
  40. The nice salesman at Toyota continuing to be attentive, without being pushy.
  41. The Skoda man not answering out call when we phoned for a final comparison.
  42. Positive reviews about the Toyota RAV4.
  43. Poor reviews of the RAV4’s infotainment system.
  44. Fellow Storyteller, Henry, who knows a lot more about cars than us, not reacting negatively when I mentioned in an offhand comment that we were considering buying a Toyota RAV4 Hybrid.
  45. Scarlett’s cousin and husband raving about their Mitsubishi hybrid.
  46. Mitsubushi’s sponsorship of Scottish Rugby. 
  47. Me being crippled by the paradox of choice that now another car was in the mix and thinking maybe we should just keep the Jeep.
  48. Someone kicking the wing mirror off and keying my Jeep - causing me to realise that an orange car in Glasgow may be viewed as a different statement than we intended by some people.
  49. Feeling sorry for our poor wee Jeep.
  50. Feeling nostalgic about driving a Jeep Cherokee in America a few years ago.
  51. The nice salesman at Jeep being incredibly attentive when we asked to virtually view the Jeep Cherokee.
  52. Frequent 2-star reviews of the Jeep Cherokee.
  53. Absolutely awful finance deals on the Jeep Cherokee. 
  54. The Skoda guy finally getting back to me with a deal that was comparable to the RAV4.
  55. Being served yet more Instagram ads by Toyota.
  56. The nice salesman at Toyota Linwood coming back with an even better offer.
  57. Our enduring belief after visiting Tokyo that the Japanese rarely do anything that’s not a cut above everything else.
  58. Nostalgia about my first car, the Toyota Yaris.
  59. Seeing pictures of the RAV4 on Toyota’s Instagram feed.
  60. Wanting to get the decision off my plate as it had taken far too long now.
  61. Reading one more positive review.
  62. Scarlett saying “stop overthinking it, it’s only a car”. 
  63. Feeling smug about the fact I’ll be driving a hybrid and doing a little bit to help the environment.
  64. Cognitive dissonance about all the evidence that hybrid’s aren’t actually all they’re cracked up to be when it comes to helping the environment.
  65. Dark blue being available and Scarlett liking the colour.
  66. Realising the infotainment system was far superior to the one we currently had.
  67. Realising we hadn’t even heard the words “infotainment system” before we started this horribly convoluted process.
  68. Scarlett shouting “stop overthinking! You don’t even like cars ” 

 

So if you’re still reading, what did you learn?

 

When it comes to building a brand, you don’t turn a brand around overnight, that requires commitment.

You need to have a product people actually want at a price that’s palatable - if you don’t, however creative your marketing is, you’ll be fighting an uphill battle. 

But if your product or service does present value to people, your product or service needs to allow them to tell themselves a story.

 

I’ve been able to tell myself I’m a somewhat environmentally-conscious chap who’s not that flashy, who’s made a responsible decision for his family by getting the best deal possible on a car that probably won’t break down and fits a pram.

I’ve been able to tell myself all that because of social proof and because of how the car companies painted a picture of their brand through advertising, PR, customer service and social media. 

 

Like what you see? Why not follow us on Instagram and subscribe to our newsletter?


Meet our new Storyteller

Meet Henry, our newest Storyteller!

He told Glasgow Live about how it feels to be a Storyteller at Story Shop:

"A marketing and PR company that launched in lockdown with great success and that is continuing to grow despite the challenges that the pandemic has brought - I think that’s special and it's really motivating. It feels good and it feels right."

Read the full article in Glasgow Live 

 

 


Here's looking at Brew, kid.

 

Story Shop, a Glasgow-based marketing and PR agency, has launched its own coffee.

The Story Shop Blend, roasted by Glasgow’s Dear Green Coffee Roasters, is available to buy on Story Shop’s website. Coffee lovers got to enjoy a first sip when it was on batch brew at US V. Them Coffee in the Gallowgate earlier this month.  

The agency officially launched just days before the first lockdown in March by a husband and wife, Gregor and Scarlett Hollerin.

Having faced the sleep deprivation of starting a business during a pandemic, combined with having their first baby, Miles, in October, the couple have worked with Dear Green to create the perfect blend to get them through these challenging times - and now they want everyone to try it.

Coffee has been a vital part of the company’s story, as it worked with Dear Green founder, Lisa Lawson, to help the annual Glasgow Coffee Festival take to the streets for the first time ever in October.

Before lockdown, the company planned every element of their business in two of their favourite local coffee shops: Black Pine Coffee and Kelvin Pocket. Now, when not in lockdown, they’re in an office, at the Glasgow Collective in the Gallowgate, Dear Green Coffee Roasters are their next-door neighbours.

The coffee’s cover was designed by Story Shop’s first two employees, Storytellers  Lara-Louisa Winnington-Ingram (who applied after seeing the job advert on Black Pine Coffee’s Instagram feed) and Katie McKenzie.

The Story Shop blend by Dear Green Coffee Roasters is made from washed AMACA beans, grown by a collective of women in El Tambo, Colombia, and natural Odaco beans grown by the Shantawene community in Ethiopia.

This vibrant coffee tastes of Golden Delicious, Opal Fruits and marmalade. All we know is that it's delicious and has a flavour that sticks with you and is perfect to enjoy while reading, watching or listening to a good story.

Lisa Lawson, founder of Dear Green, said: “It’s been great working with the team at Story Shop on this coffee. It’s delicious, unique and super fruity.”

It's already received rave reviews from Glasgow Live editor Gillian Loney, who gave the coffee five stars (hopefully that's out of five).

The company’s first-ever client was world record-breaking rowers Broar. Their campaign helped raise more than £200K for Feedback Madagascar and Children 1st.  After trying the coffee, middle brother Jamie said: "If we had this coffee on board, we'd have rowed even faster."

The company used this initial campaign as a launching pad to work with ambitious organisations with a purpose in food and drink, health and wellness, tech, education and property. At the start of the pandemic, Story Shop helped another Scottish world record-breaker, Mark Beaumont, raise £230K for NHS Charities Together.

Story Shop co-founder Gregor Hollerin said: “As a reward for those of you who've read this far down in our blog post, I'll let you in on a little secret. We're not really pivoting to coffee. There's actually a very limited amount of coffee available to buy because the hassle of wrestling with Royal Mail to send out coffee would be far too time-consuming and divert us from our important client work.

"The main reason for doing this is that we wanted to create a unique gift for everyone that's helped or supported us during our first year of business. It's quite nerve-wracking to start a business but we are so glad we did - we have amazing clients who we genuinely believe in, an incredibly talented team and we're part of a great community of partners who we work with on projects. If you helped us in any way, but didn't receive a coffee, we reserve the right to blame Covid."


We're recruiting a PR guru!

WELL WHAT’S ALL THIS? CAN YOU TELL ME MORE PLEASE?!

We’re looking to add a new Storyteller to our team. Someone who can help us tell our clients stories in the media.

We’ve achieved coverage for our clients everywhere from BBC to CNN. But we won’t rest on our laurels and are looking to find someone to join our team who can help spread our clients’ stories even further.  

We’re looking for someone who will truly understand what our clients want, and be able to work with them to build their story in the media.  

HMM! Sounds intriguing. So I know Story Shop’s a cool, funky, egalitarian agency and nobody will ever be pigeon-holed, but tell me some of the things I might be up to on a day to day basis?

  • Working with our team of storytellers to develop client PR strategies
  • Writing compelling press releases
  • Monitoring the media for opportunities for our clients
  • Building relationships with journalists
  • Dreaming up creative ideas for our clients
  • Getting to know our clients so you can truly understand their story and what they want to achieve.
  • Reporting and analysis

Do you think I could be a good fit?

Do you really know what it takes to get stories placed in the media – either for clients or as a journalist?

Do you have a varied media diet? Do you constantly consume books, magazines, podcasts and documentaries? Are you full of creative ideas for ways to gain exposure for our clients?

Do you have real relationships with a wide variety of journalists?

Can you really write?

Are you genuinely fascinated by entrepreneurs and the stories of businesses who do good in the world? Would you be obsessed by making our clients’ campaigns a success? 

Are you self-aware but confident in your skills, knowledge and abilities?

1000 times yes to all those things! You’ve basically just described me! But I won’t just work for anyone. Convince me!

  • We want to change the world of work and will constantly strive to make Story Shop the best place to work possible.
  • We realise being always on comes at a cost for creativity, productivity and happiness. You get what you celebrate, and we celebrate creativity, collaboration, honesty and enthusiasm, not presenteeism.
  • We’ll learn constantly from these mistakes and always try to do what’s right by our team.
  • You’ll always be able to challenge and execute your own judgement. If we’re hiring you, it’s because we believe in you, so we’ll trust you and listen to you.
  • We’ll treat you as a unique person; that’s why we won’t talk about perks or ways of working. These will both be created around what works best for you. You can work where, when and how you work best, and we’ll always do our best to recognise the work you’re doing.
  • You’ll work when and where works best for you and the team.
  • You’ll be paid a competitive salary.
  • You’ll be part of a team that looks out for each other and is capable of achieving something special.
  • We’re not sector specific – our clients work in every sector that interests us. The one thing they’ll always have in common is that we believe in what they’re doing.
  • You’ll be free to do your best work and will never be pigeon-holed into one client, one industry or one specialty. 

 I’m sold! How do I apply?

Tell us your story at hello@wearestoryshop.com

 Applications close on 14 January. 


We're recruiting a Paid Social specialist!

WELL WHAT’S ALL THIS? CAN YOU TELL ME MORE PLEASE?!

We’re looking for someone to work closely with our team of Storytellers to help our clients raise awareness with paid social campaigns.

This person will help to develop a paid strategy for our clients and will be responsible for auditing, setting-up, managing and optimising Paid Social campaigns, as well as all reporting and analysis.

This position is ideal for someone who has experience managing Paid Social campaigns either in-house or agency side.

HMM! Sounds intriguing. So I know Story Shop’s a cool, funky, egalitarian agency and nobody will ever be pigeon-holed, but tell me some of the things I might be up to on a day to day basis?

  • Setting-up ads – including audience research, writing relevant ads and building an effective campaign.
  • Working with our team of Storytellers to write compelling ad copy and to create graphic
  • Managing and optimising campaigns
  • Analysis and ongoing recommendations to improve campaign performance
  • Regular updates, reports and measurement of success

Do you think I could be a good fit?

Do you have experience running paid social campaigns cross multiple channels?  Maybe you’re dabbled in PPC or SEO as well?  If you’re a PPC or SEO guru, who’s only dabbled with social ads, we’d still love to hear from you though…

Are you fascinated by entrepreneurs and the stories of businesses who do good in the world? Would you genuinely care about our clients’ success?

Are you curious about new platforms and new techniques? Do you have a desire to learn and would you take the initiative to upskill?

Do you live and breathe numbers? Are you highly analytical?

Are you self-aware but confident in your skills, knowledge and abilities?

1000 times yes to all those things! You’ve basically just described me! But I won’t just work for anyone. Convince me!

  • We want to change the world of work and will constantly strive to make Story Shop the best place to work possible.
  • We realise being always on comes at a cost for creativity, productivity and happiness. You get what you celebrate, and we celebrate creativity, collaboration, honesty and enthusiasm, not presenteeism.
  • We’ll learn constantly from these mistakes and always try to do what’s right by our team.
  • You’ll always be able to challenge and execute your own judgement. If we’re hiring you, it’s because we believe in you, so we’ll trust you and listen to you.
  • We’ll treat you as a unique person; that’s why we won’t talk about perks or ways of working. These will both be created around what works best for you. You can work where, when and how you work best, and we’ll always do our best to recognise the work you’re doing.
  • You’ll work when and where works best for you and the team.
  • You’ll be paid a competitive salary.
  • You’ll be part of a team that looks out for each other and is capable of achieving special things. 
  • We’re not sector specific – our clients work in every sector that interests us. The one thing they’ll always have in common is that we believe in what they’re doing.
  • You’ll be free to do your best work and will never be pigeon-holed into one client, one industry or one specialty. 

 I’m sold! How do I apply?

Tell us your story at hello@wearestoryshop.com

 Applications close on 14 January. 


a blue puzzle with a stand out, pink piece.

10 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF WHEN APPLYING FOR A JOB IN PR OR MARKETING

Finding a job during this time is difficult. We've hired our first two Storytellers and are now advertising for two more, a paid social specialist and a PR guru.

When we hired a few months ago, we posted a job advert out on our own social media channels and received more than 80 applications. There were far more plausible candidates than we ever bargained for - which meant it took a lot to stand out.

Clearly, now is a challenging time for the industry and for the time-being, there are more people out there looking for a job than there are jobs available. Having gone through the hiring process, we’ve summed-up 10 questions to ask yourself when you're applying for a new role in marketing, with us or with anyone else.

1. Do I know the name of the company I’m applying to?

A few people called our company by the wrong name ("hi WeareStory team!). Suffice to say, it was a bit of an uphill battle from there.

2. Do I really want to work with Story Shop?

If the answer’s no, don’t bother applying. There are too many people enthusiastic for a job to be aloof or hard to get in an interview. Those who were enthusiastic stood out.

3. Do I understand what type of company I’m applying to?

I’m sure there are still some people who like to be called Sir/Madam but we are not them. That’s a tell-tale sign you know nothing about us.

4. Do I have the time to dedicate to the task?

If you get the opportunity to do a task - knock it out of the park or don’t do it. Other people will give it everything.

5. Have I researched the company’s history and clients?

If we don’t have to spend time telling you about the company, you have more to impress.

6. Am I showing my authentic self?

We wanted to hire people who we could not only work well with, but could bring different viewpoints to the table. Personality matters and people can tell when you're pretending to be something you aren't.

7. Am I confident in what I’m presenting?

Our job is to make sure that every touchpoint of a company shows them in the best light. Bland boring word docs won’t fill agencies with confidence. Be creative. Be bespoke.

8. Will they remember me?

Do something to make your mark. Those who came with creative leave-behinds really impressed us.

9. How do my social channels look?

If you’re looking for a job in marketing, people hiring will probably take a look.

10. Should I follow-up?

Yes. Don’t be pushy but it really helps you stand out from the crowd.

To apply for a role at Story Shop, tell us your Story at hello@wearestoryshop.com. Or you can sign up to our newsletter to see what we're up to!


So, what does it mean to be a “Storyteller?”

In a recent blog, Gregor told you about the tough decisions Story Shop's had to navigate since it launched. Deciding to hire me (Lara) was one of them.

Now that I've been around for a few months, I wanted to give you a little insight into what it's like to work for a small agency like Story Shop and what it actually means to be a "Storyteller." A Storyteller is someone who, well, tells stories. But how does that fit into marketing?

Storytelling is a huge part of marketing, and we all do it, even if our job title isn't Storyteller (which mine is). Marketers use narratives every day to communicate brand messages. Think of the box of cereal on your kitchen table this morning. I bet there was a story hidden somewhere on it. Or maybe it wasn't hidden at all - some of us have been following the tale of either three gnomes, a monkey or a tiger since before we could read.  

At Story Shop, we've not yet created a mascot for our client or launched a cereal, (yet), but we do find and create brand stories that we hope will be around for a very long time. Just as you buy from brands that you know and trust, we work with the ones we believe in and think have a story worth telling.

Before working at Story Shop, I was working at a London-based creative content agency, Not Actual Size. My experience there taught me a lot about the importance of creating content that's relevant. But finding a balance between being relevant and standing out can be difficult. Often, a brand has a fantastic story to tell, but they don't know how to tell it or where to start. As Donald Miller puts it in Building a Story Brand, "people behind a brand can't read the label when they find themselves stuck inside the bottle." That's where Storytellers come in.

Whatever we're up to, whether it's coming up with a snappy Instagram caption, designing images for a Facebook ad or creating a wider communications strategy, we have two primary roles.

  1. We have to develop the strategy for our story - that means we have to truly understand what our client really wants, their mission and the steps that will help them achieve it. This all starts with questions, lots of questions, like what's your key message? What calls to action resonate with your customer? Who even is your customer? What makes you stand out from the rest?
  2. We have to make sure the stuff we make is creative and impactful. That means telling stories which get picked up by the media, blog posts people actually read, newsletters which people will open, social media posts which stop people scrolling and all those other modern miracles.

All of this takes time.

To deliver on part one, we need to take the time with the client to truly understand their business and their customers. We like to get to know the people we work with and get just as excited about their businesses as they are - that's the easy part. 

For part two, we have to do something that's often harder to do than it sounds. Step away from our emails, close our laptops and begin to bounce ideas off each other. We don't just put the bottle in the middle of the table. We bring our own ideas, shaped by our different influences and backgrounds.  

I could follow all the marketing techniques I was taught at university, follow every agency on LinkedIn and continue to read weekly marketing newsletters all I like, but without allowing space for creativity, I wouldn't be a Storyteller. I'd just be a teller. A noisemaker.

So, you probably get the point, but what have we actually got to say for ourselves at Story Shop? What makes us different? Aren't we just another one of those agencies that think it's cool to wear trainers to work and drink kombucha?

Well, yes, but we do other stuff too. In fact, if anyone's keeping score, here are just a few of the amazing things we've done so far since I started Story Shop.

  • Helped take Glasgow Coffee Festival to the streets
  • Launched a new, all-day eatery in Glasgow's Merchant City
  • Completely redesigned an office space (we didn't even have one when I started)
  • Hired two more members of the team (there are now five of us!)
  • Began a campaign to make HOKO the UK's go-to residential architect (we love being an extension of their team)
  • Secured over 200 news articles for the entrepreneurs, charities and brands who choose to work with us across the media, including front pages in the Metro and the Herald and piece in the New York Post
  • Lasted a whole day in the office without going to Us V Them for a caffeine refuel

 

I'm not a writer, I'm just here for the free oat milk flat whites. But we all do a bit of everything at Story Shop, so I hope you enjoyed my first blog.

If you have any questions or want to hear more about the great things we're doing, send us an email on hello@wearestoryshop.com