We're recruiting a PR guru!

WELL WHAT’S ALL THIS? CAN YOU TELL ME MORE PLEASE?!

We’re looking to add a new Storyteller to our team. Someone who can help us tell our clients stories in the media.

We’ve achieved coverage for our clients everywhere from BBC to CNN. But we won’t rest on our laurels and are looking to find someone to join our team who can help spread our clients’ stories even further.  

We’re looking for someone who will truly understand what our clients want, and be able to work with them to build their story in the media.  

HMM! Sounds intriguing. So I know Story Shop’s a cool, funky, egalitarian agency and nobody will ever be pigeon-holed, but tell me some of the things I might be up to on a day to day basis?

  • Working with our team of storytellers to develop client PR strategies
  • Writing compelling press releases
  • Monitoring the media for opportunities for our clients
  • Building relationships with journalists
  • Dreaming up creative ideas for our clients
  • Getting to know our clients so you can truly understand their story and what they want to achieve.
  • Reporting and analysis

Do you think I could be a good fit?

Do you really know what it takes to get stories placed in the media – either for clients or as a journalist?

Do you have a varied media diet? Do you constantly consume books, magazines, podcasts and documentaries? Are you full of creative ideas for ways to gain exposure for our clients?

Do you have real relationships with a wide variety of journalists?

Can you really write?

Are you genuinely fascinated by entrepreneurs and the stories of businesses who do good in the world? Would you be obsessed by making our clients’ campaigns a success? 

Are you self-aware but confident in your skills, knowledge and abilities?

1000 times yes to all those things! You’ve basically just described me! But I won’t just work for anyone. Convince me!

  • We want to change the world of work and will constantly strive to make Story Shop the best place to work possible.
  • We realise being always on comes at a cost for creativity, productivity and happiness. You get what you celebrate, and we celebrate creativity, collaboration, honesty and enthusiasm, not presenteeism.
  • We’ll learn constantly from these mistakes and always try to do what’s right by our team.
  • You’ll always be able to challenge and execute your own judgement. If we’re hiring you, it’s because we believe in you, so we’ll trust you and listen to you.
  • We’ll treat you as a unique person; that’s why we won’t talk about perks or ways of working. These will both be created around what works best for you. You can work where, when and how you work best, and we’ll always do our best to recognise the work you’re doing.
  • You’ll work when and where works best for you and the team.
  • You’ll be paid a competitive salary.
  • You’ll be part of a team that looks out for each other and is capable of achieving something special.
  • We’re not sector specific – our clients work in every sector that interests us. The one thing they’ll always have in common is that we believe in what they’re doing.
  • You’ll be free to do your best work and will never be pigeon-holed into one client, one industry or one specialty. 

 I’m sold! How do I apply?

Tell us your story at hello@wearestoryshop.com

 Applications close on 14 January. 


We're recruiting a Paid Social specialist!

WELL WHAT’S ALL THIS? CAN YOU TELL ME MORE PLEASE?!

We’re looking for someone to work closely with our team of Storytellers to help our clients raise awareness with paid social campaigns.

This person will help to develop a paid strategy for our clients and will be responsible for auditing, setting-up, managing and optimising Paid Social campaigns, as well as all reporting and analysis.

This position is ideal for someone who has experience managing Paid Social campaigns either in-house or agency side.

HMM! Sounds intriguing. So I know Story Shop’s a cool, funky, egalitarian agency and nobody will ever be pigeon-holed, but tell me some of the things I might be up to on a day to day basis?

  • Setting-up ads – including audience research, writing relevant ads and building an effective campaign.
  • Working with our team of Storytellers to write compelling ad copy and to create graphic
  • Managing and optimising campaigns
  • Analysis and ongoing recommendations to improve campaign performance
  • Regular updates, reports and measurement of success

Do you think I could be a good fit?

Do you have experience running paid social campaigns cross multiple channels?  Maybe you’re dabbled in PPC or SEO as well?  If you’re a PPC or SEO guru, who’s only dabbled with social ads, we’d still love to hear from you though…

Are you fascinated by entrepreneurs and the stories of businesses who do good in the world? Would you genuinely care about our clients’ success?

Are you curious about new platforms and new techniques? Do you have a desire to learn and would you take the initiative to upskill?

Do you live and breathe numbers? Are you highly analytical?

Are you self-aware but confident in your skills, knowledge and abilities?

1000 times yes to all those things! You’ve basically just described me! But I won’t just work for anyone. Convince me!

  • We want to change the world of work and will constantly strive to make Story Shop the best place to work possible.
  • We realise being always on comes at a cost for creativity, productivity and happiness. You get what you celebrate, and we celebrate creativity, collaboration, honesty and enthusiasm, not presenteeism.
  • We’ll learn constantly from these mistakes and always try to do what’s right by our team.
  • You’ll always be able to challenge and execute your own judgement. If we’re hiring you, it’s because we believe in you, so we’ll trust you and listen to you.
  • We’ll treat you as a unique person; that’s why we won’t talk about perks or ways of working. These will both be created around what works best for you. You can work where, when and how you work best, and we’ll always do our best to recognise the work you’re doing.
  • You’ll work when and where works best for you and the team.
  • You’ll be paid a competitive salary.
  • You’ll be part of a team that looks out for each other and is capable of achieving special things. 
  • We’re not sector specific – our clients work in every sector that interests us. The one thing they’ll always have in common is that we believe in what they’re doing.
  • You’ll be free to do your best work and will never be pigeon-holed into one client, one industry or one specialty. 

 I’m sold! How do I apply?

Tell us your story at hello@wearestoryshop.com

 Applications close on 14 January. 


a blue puzzle with a stand out, pink piece.

10 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF WHEN APPLYING FOR A JOB IN PR OR MARKETING

Finding a job during this time is difficult. We've hired our first two Storytellers and are now advertising for two more, a paid social specialist and a PR guru.

When we hired a few months ago, we posted a job advert out on our own social media channels and received more than 80 applications. There were far more plausible candidates than we ever bargained for - which meant it took a lot to stand out.

Clearly, now is a challenging time for the industry and for the time-being, there are more people out there looking for a job than there are jobs available. Having gone through the hiring process, we’ve summed-up 10 questions to ask yourself when you're applying for a new role in marketing, with us or with anyone else.

1. Do I know the name of the company I’m applying to?

A few people called our company by the wrong name ("hi WeareStory team!). Suffice to say, it was a bit of an uphill battle from there.

2. Do I really want to work with Story Shop?

If the answer’s no, don’t bother applying. There are too many people enthusiastic for a job to be aloof or hard to get in an interview. Those who were enthusiastic stood out.

3. Do I understand what type of company I’m applying to?

I’m sure there are still some people who like to be called Sir/Madam but we are not them. That’s a tell-tale sign you know nothing about us.

4. Do I have the time to dedicate to the task?

If you get the opportunity to do a task - knock it out of the park or don’t do it. Other people will give it everything.

5. Have I researched the company’s history and clients?

If we don’t have to spend time telling you about the company, you have more to impress.

6. Am I showing my authentic self?

We wanted to hire people who we could not only work well with, but could bring different viewpoints to the table. Personality matters and people can tell when you're pretending to be something you aren't.

7. Am I confident in what I’m presenting?

Our job is to make sure that every touchpoint of a company shows them in the best light. Bland boring word docs won’t fill agencies with confidence. Be creative. Be bespoke.

8. Will they remember me?

Do something to make your mark. Those who came with creative leave-behinds really impressed us.

9. How do my social channels look?

If you’re looking for a job in marketing, people hiring will probably take a look.

10. Should I follow-up?

Yes. Don’t be pushy but it really helps you stand out from the crowd.

To apply for a role at Story Shop, tell us your Story at hello@wearestoryshop.com. Or you can sign up to our newsletter to see what we're up to!


Interning at Story Shop

 

I’ve always had an interest in marketing. There’s something about the high degree of creative thinking that jobs in the industry that sparked intrigue in me. As someone who classes themselves as a creative individual, I’ve always felt that it was quite a natural step for me in my career.

While I’ve not long graduated (great timing, I’m aware), my background is in journalism, with a particular focus on culture, music and sport. Having written for a number of publications across these areas, I’ve managed to climb up the experience ladder, earn editorial positions, and secure internships at magazines and radio stations to show a diverse range of industry experience. I’ve worked hard to build up a diverse portfolio to ideally open my career prospects to a plethora of industries.

Then I graduated into a pretty challenging climate. I felt I was entering the job market with an open and well-rounded CV, but the number of jobs in any sector were particularly sparse, given the sad state of events in 2020 (thanks, COVID).

I started to dip my toes into marketing job applications. Of course, as is typical of most job applications, I received few responses beyond the auto-reply application received, although many didn’t even offer that. 

Thankfully, I found a job advert from Story Shop, asking for a creative individual to come and join their team as a first hire.

It’s not very often you can get excited about the application process for the potential role, but the unique task of ‘telling your own story’ through creative means stood out to me and told me a lot of good things about the company and the people running it. So much so, that I already knew the role was a good one, as they wanted to see potential new recruits’ originality and personality, something truly rare in job applications.

With the role being particularly focused on digital marketing and social media management, I told my story through social media, using only photos I’d put up online (which reminded me just how many I’ve shared over the years too). I was delighted when my application was accepted for an interview, over Zoom, of course (thanks again, COVID).

The interview went well, and to my surprise, I was asked to come in for another one a week later – which again, seemed to go nicely. Something that became abundantly clear to me was that not only were Gregor and Scarlett great people, they also read me very well. My experience was varied and across sectors, but they saw me a good enough fit to interview me a couple of times, and as someone who could potentially grow and learn with the company.

While I was really hopeful of getting the role, I knew my lack of experience may set me back against the competition. My gut was right, and while I didn’t get the job, I was taken aback by the kind offer of a summer-long paid internship to work with them instead. They’d never planned to take on an intern and a new hire, and I’m massively thankful of their kindness and belief to create an opportunity, let alone a paid one, simply because they trusted in what I could do.

Of course, I snapped up the offer with both hands and never looked back. And, as expected on taking the role, interning at Story Shop was a really wonderful experience to learn from and work with two of the best people in the business.

Working with Gregor and Scarlett and across their board of clients, they helped me sharpen my skills, working on my copywriting and SEO, getting a better understanding of the industry, its processes and what it takes to be good at marketing and PR. By researching the companies they worked with, I managed to gain a great understanding of so many different businesses. 

Even aside from the work which was highly enjoyable, Gregor and Scarlett were both so hospitable to me, inviting me into their home, socially distanced (truly, thanks again, COVID), to work for the day in their office, offered me lunch, and chat about all sorts.

While I was really sad to finish the internship come September, I left on great terms – and me leaving on a positive note was actually their doing too. Through a connection with their client, Tim Elizondo, Gregor secured me a job interview for the position of Marketing Coordinator at Attis Fitness – and I got the job.

Thankfully, I get to work close to Story Shop on Attis’ marketing, meaning even in my new role, I’m still working with and learning from the best people in the business.

Graduating during one of the most turbulent times in modern history wasn’t part of my plans for 2020. And with such an intense and hectic job market that’s now more saturated and trickier to navigate than ever, I couldn’t have imagined the luck I’d have in meeting Gregor and Scarlett and being taken on as an intern for Story Shop.

In just two months, they helped me learn a great deal about both marketing and PR. They taught me skills I wouldn’t have learnt from a simple rejection letter. I learnt a lot about the industry and what I can do in it in a really short space of time, but without that experience, I would be a lot worse off.

2020 might be an awful year on the whole, but Gregor, Scarlett and Story Shop are proof that there is still a lot of good in the world.

Dylan Tuck.


Navigating tough decisions in year one

When starting a business, you have to answer endless questions. To try and inform our decisions, we have sought advice from lots of people, read lots of books and listened to too many podcasts. We’ve tried really hard to find the right answer to all these questions, but the fact is none of the big questions you’re faced with when starting a business have a right answer. You can only inform yourself so much, and then it comes down to gut.

Here are some of the questions we’ve asked along the way, and how we’ve answered them.

Should we start a business together as husband and wife?

A lot of people told us that was risky, but in our gut, we knew it felt right. We have a complementary skill set and temperament. We also are entirely aligned in our values so neither of us could ask for a more perfect business partner. Having met other successful founders like Darina Garland , who founded Ooni with her husband Kristian, and our friends Craig and Laura at Tag Digital, we saw their examples as a defence in our minds against all the naysayers who said it was the wrong move.

Should we be sector specific?

Much of the advice we received was that we should be sector specific and really hone in on one industry. But if the pandemic has taught us anything, it’s that being sector specific can leave a marketing company very exposed. We also don’t want to be pigeon-holed. We have rich experience in sport, charity, retail, hospitality, food and drink, and a broad range of interests. We want to be able to work with companies who shared our values, for people and entrepreneurs we believe in, regardless of their sector, so that’s what we do.

Should we run a campaign for free?

The day we began our business began, we could have started spamming LinkedIn inboxes, asking for a meeting to try and scramble to fill our books. But, instead, we decided to busy ourselves by running a Pro Bono campaign. When both members of a couple leave their jobs, money’s inevitably a factor, however, the thing about a family business is you can think long term. By running all PR and Marketing for Broar’s Talisker Whisky Atlantic Challenge, we could both learn how to work together as business partners and also demonstrate what we were capable of.  We worked together to develop worldwide media coverage and a hugely invested social following – and in doing so helped to raise more than £150K for charity.

Should we hire now?

It’s a critical point for any company whether or not to make that first hire. Things were going really well with just the two of us and we could have probably kept going as we were for another few months. However, we also knew that working seven days per week, every week was not sustainable. As much as we love our work, if we don’t have time to step away, things will slip. We want to say small (I personally don’t really like the term “boutique” agency, but that’s, I guess, what we want to be), but we always wanted the business to be bigger than just the two of us.

Who should we hire? 

We were deliberately wooly with our job advert, as we wanted to find someone who would be the right fit. Not only someone who could bring real value to our clients, but also someone we would enjoy working with. The quality of the 70+ applications was far better than we expected and the whole process was very difficult. It was incredibly time intensive as we wanted to make the right decision and because there were so many good people. After a month of countless zooms, we’re very happy with our decision to hire Lara!

Should we move into an office?

We love our flat. Scarlett’s biggest passion outside of work is interior design and she’s made it look great, but as much as we like our home office, we started to notice how little separation there was between life and work, and we looked at the practicalities of keeping our home and work base the same as our team, and our family, expands. In the end, we decided to go for an office, at the Glasgow Collective. And we’re excited to show you Scarlett’s Pinterest board come to life inside our new office in the near future.

They are the questions we have some sort of answer to, but there’s plenty more questions we’re working very hard to answer!

If you have any questions about Story Shop, send us an email on hello@wearestoryshop.com.

 


Telling an authentic story

We’re proud to help businesses tell their authentic story.

While most of our clients are returning to some sort of normality, some continue to face uncertainty, including:

  1. SLAM -  an independent gym in Glasgow with no idea when it could reopen its doors to its community once again. 
  2. CCW - a Scottish outdoor lifestyle retailer operating in three tourist hotspots, suffering from the lack of certainty over when visitors would return to Scotland.

They had a choice to make. Either they stay quiet and wait for things to blow over, or they could stick their head above the parapet to challenge policy.

We worked through the plusses and negatives of each side, and ultimately, both decided they wanted to take this opportunity to stand up as leaders and show customers, teams and communities that they were not afraid to make their voice heard.

Last week, the Geddes family, owners of CCW, and Lyndsey Roberts, owner of SLAM, stood up for what mattered to them across the media.

On BBC Drivetime, Capital Radio and in Glasgow Live, Lyndsey eloquently explained how fitness helped her navigate her own mental health struggles, the measures she was taking to ensure her gym was a safe, secure, sanitised space and detailed her concerns as a business owner.

We helped Lyndsey use the media as a platform to ask why pubs should be allowed to open while small independent gyms remain closed. She said:

"It's not about the money, though of course we've been adversely affected. So much of it is about the community, about relationships. I know all of my clients by name.” 

"The feedback I get tells me that everyone's mental health is affected due to isolation, loneliness, being away from the things they love. People really need this. The longer gyms stay closed, the harder it will get."

 

Lyndsey Roberts, owner of Strong Like A Mutha

 

Meanwhile, on BBC Good Morning Scotland and in ten national newspapers, CCW openly voiced their concerns about the continuing concern for local Scottish businesses – which rely heavily on tourism –uncertainty of rules for English and international tourists coming to visit.

The family’s shops in St Andrews, Callander, and Glasgow, alongside other businesses in those areas, would normally be packed full of tourists. Alas, COVID has prevented much of this business from happening, but with debate to be had about how to best help affected businesses, we pushed their conversations to the forefront. Taking this opportunity to stand-up not only increased brand awareness at a time when it was crucial but it also quite literally challenged the government – Nicola Sturgeon was asked about CCW’s comments at the Coronavirus Briefing last Tuesday.

 

The Geddes family, owners of CCW.

 

Whether or not you agree with any government policy on either matter, what this goes to show is the true power of the media in holding a government to account. We believe in the businesses we work with and want to help them amplify their message, even when times are tough.

As a result, these stories helped to raise awareness of the businesses because they were genuine stories. People can tell when stories are authentic. These businesses will have fun, exciting tales to tell in the future, and we’re very excited to tell them. But for now, trying to reverse engineer things to tell an inauthentic story would be a disservice to them, their communities and customers.


To podcast or not to podcast?

I’m Gregor, one half of Story Shop (soon to be one third)

As we navigate the Coronavirus pandemic, I’ve battled with the same question as most other men in their 30s; “should I start a podcast”?

Podcasting is one of those things that everyone thinks they could and should do. But like starting a restaurant, or writing a novel, it’s much harder than it looks.

I love podcasts, they’ve been a huge part of my life since 2007, when Adam and Joe, Bill Simmons and James Richardson and the gang on Guardian Football weekly first entered my ears.

I’ve loved pizza since 1990, and I’ve never once considered becoming a pizza chef. What is it about the power of podcasting which gives people an unstoppable urge to make their own?

The main reason is the barrier to entry is low and it’s completely subjective. What separates a good and bad podcast is hard to put your finger on, until you hear a really good one.

Podcasts fall into two categories, high perceived effort and low perceived effort.

Low perceived effort podcasts

“Low perceived effort podcasts” lull people into a false sense of security. Anyone can order a mic from Amazon, download Skype and call a friend or two for an interview or to discuss the issues of the day.

These are typically conducted as an interview, e.g. :

  • The Joe Rogan Experience
  • How I Built This w/ Guy Raz
  • The CMO Podcast w/ Jim Stengel
  • Black on the Air w/ Larry Wilmore
  • Grounded w/ Louis TherouX

Or, as a round table where guests can pontificate on the news of the day, such as:

  • Pod Save America
  • Code Switch
  • Business Casual
  • Press Box
  • Guardian Football / Politics Weekly

(Solo podcasts like the Daily Stoic, Naval and Akimbo with Seth Godin are a grey area. Anyone could technically start doing this without much planning, but it would take a unique person to fight off the imposter syndrome which would no doubt loom large as a potential podcaster prepares to push record without the help of guest or a co-host.)

Although I’ve classed these podcasts as “low” perceived effort. They are not low actual effort.

To create a podcast in the same stratosphere as those listed have done, it typically relies on a) an incredibly interesting guest with a unique point of view and b) a host who is both incredibly knowledgeable, inquisitive and knows when and how to get out the way.

High perceived effort podcasts

Budding amateur podcasters are far less likely to try what I would class as a “high perceived effort podcast”. For one, these usually require a bit of editing.

These podcasts interrogate a specific issue or tell a longer form story.

They either tend to be carefully chosen experts deployed to build a narrative to break a story down and tell it, over the course of a single podcast, like:

  • The Daily
  • This American Life
  •  Hidden Brain,
  • Revisionist History
  • Freakonomics

Or stories told over a matter of weeks or months, for example:

  • The Last Days of August,
  • Serial
  • Slow Burn
  • Bad Blood
  • Business Wars

These podcasts require a huge amount of investment to get somewhere of huge value. They are essentially documentaries in podcast form.

It’s far more time-consuming than pontificating or interviewing. That’s why this route is rarely explored as a side-hustle.

My podcast

My podcast is low-perceived effort. Extremely low-perceived effort. Because it doesn’t exist. I’ve talked about it a lot since December. This has been high-perceived effort for the people who’ve listened to me drone on about it.

I had enquired about booking a studio, and had my first guest lined up, but then the Coronavirus gave a very convenient excuse which was compounded by everyone in the Western world ordering a podcast mic on Amazon. So now I’m back here, writing this blog.

Does the world need my podcast?  Regardless of whether or not we shake our current predicament, I don’t think my podcast will have had much to do with it.

People like Zara Janjua and Nashy are doing a brilliant job already, telling the stories of Scottish entrepreneurs, but I think there are so many exciting entrepreneurs in our country doing brilliant things. So there could be room for a couple more podcasts…

Besides, I can’t spend the rest of my 30s asking myself whether I should start a podcast. It’s time to decide one way or the other.

A podcast I’ve really enjoyed these last few weeks The Founder’s Journal by Alex Lieberman, the CEO of Morning Brew. His podcast is an unfiltered look into what it’s like to run a company – including all the mistakes.

This has been immensely valuable as I can learn from how he wrestles with serious issues: from staying laser focused on a mission to how to make sure you build a business which is diverse and inclusive.

Recently, on LinkedIn, he said something which resonated with me a lot: “Talking shop with creative, empathetic and inspired entrepreneurs will never get old.”

That’s the type of person we want to work with at Story Shop, and it’s the type of person I’d like to talk to on my podcast…if I ever do start one.

Get in touch to help me break free from the nagging imposter’s syndrome asking “why would anyone want to hear from me” , or to give me some cold hard home truths about how the world already has enough podcasts.


HOW TO RAISE MORE THAN £200,000 FOR CHARITY IN JUST FOUR WEEKS

 

Mark Beaumont, the man who cycled Around the World in 80 Days,  came up with the idea of a charity campaign based on a day in the life of his record-breaking ride – from home during lockdown – on April 19.

By May 14, Mark and hundreds of other cyclists and rowers across the UK had raised more than £231, 000 for NHS Charities Together by donating miles on their indoor bikes or rowers every Thursday for four consecutive Thursdays.

We worked on the campaign to help Mark make his ambitious idea a reality and raise an incredible amount of money for a very worthwhile cause. Here's what we learned from him:

Just do it

If you have an idea, you could tweak it and tweak it forever. You're more likely to lose momentum than make it perfect. If Mark had waited instead of capitalising on the initial enthusiasm of a group of hardy cyclists when he originally mooted the idea, the event may not have had the same impact.

Create a unique selling point

There are so many charity campaigns out there, what makes yours different? With World in a Day, Mark gave other riders the chance to ride with a world record breaker and do something which very few others would every get the chance to do – walk a mile (or cycle 240 miles) in their shoes.

Don't be afraid to ask for favours

People can only say no. Mark was able to tap into an impressive list of athletes and adventurers who generously donated their time by participating on the weekly Zoom call for entrants with advice, insight and encouragement. This helped to makes the event extra special and created a further driver for participants to sign-up. Then by calling on John Davidson, he tapped into an entirely new network and rallied hundreds of rowers to take part.

Build a community

Whether it's during the global pandemic, when we're all socially isolated, or in normal times, when lack of connection is a major contributing factor to a rising occurrence of depression, people crave connection. Mark created this in World in a Day with the weekly Zoom call for all participants, which was the highlight of the event for many. Even during the ride's toughest moments, they could count on support from Mark and hundreds of other riders and rowers to get them through.

Play to your strengths

Originally, the event appealed for riders, rowers and runners. It soon became apparent that the take up and interest in the event was really only going to be from riders and rowers because of a combination of existing charity campaigns focusing on runners, and the event's key selling point, that it was for people at home and very few people have treadmills. Rather than try to flog a dead horse, the decision was taken to double down and focus on cultivating the strong cycling and rowing community.

Don't try and do it all yourself

Mark's a unique person – you don't become the fastest person to cycle around the world without an insane amount of drive and determination. But part of the event's success was bringing on a team he trusted to share the load and add their expertise. We were proud to have been  part of that team and lead on the marketing of the campaign, while a website from Ping Creates, video from Morrocco media and graphic design from Jerry Balloch, as well as lots of heavy lifting from Steve Bate and Mel Nicholls, made this a true team effort

Pick a cause which means something to you

This seems obvious, but if you don't have a story people can buy into, it will become very difficult to rally a fundraising effort around it. NHS Charities Together was chosen for obvious reasons – as people sit at home and feel helpless, this became something they could do to contribute and make a difference to the NHS, while protecting it.


We're Hiring!

 

*JOB ADVERT NOW CLOSED*

An open letter to our first employee.

So far, this company has just been us - Scarlett and Gregor.

Now we’ve decided we need some help and are looking to make our first hire.

Our long-term vision for this company is to build a small, motivated, trusted creative team who constantly collaborate, and each bring their unique ideas, insight and quirks to the table so we can  build long-term relationships with clients and help them reach their goals.

To tell these stories, you need a blend of organisation and creativity. There are infinite ways we can tell clients' stories, but social platforms and websites play a major part. So, we are looking for someone who’s skilled in social media management (required) and social ad management/ SEO (preferred).

Initially, this role will be on a six-month contract. This could be full-time, however we’re open to discussions around number of days, as long as we are confident we can gain the support required from the new team member.

You’ll be working from your home mostly. Because we’re a really cool company, and because of Coronavirus.

Job title to be discussed. Tell us what you’d like to be called and we’ll probably just go with that. Director’s taken but everything else is up for grabs.

Our commitment to you:

  • We realise being always on comes at a cost for creativity, productivity and happiness. You get what you celebrate, and we celebrate creativity, collaboration, honesty and enthusiasm, not presenteeism.
  • We’ve managed people before, but never without support from colleagues, HR etc. We’ve tried to build as much of a support system as possible so we can do as many things right by our first employee, but the likelihood is we’ll make mistakes. We’ll learn constantly from these mistakes and be the best managers we can be.
  • You’ll always be able to challenge us and execute your own judgement. If we’re hiring you, it’s because we believe in you, so we’ll trust you and listen to you.
  • We’ll treat you as a unique person; that’s why we won’t talk about perks or ways of working in this letter. As they will both be created around what works best for you. You can work where, when and how you work best, and we’ll always do our best to recognise the work you’re doing.

This is an exciting next chapter for us. Our company tell stories about brands and people we believe in. If you want to be part of our story, tell us your story at hello@wearestoryshop.com

Scarlett & Gregor


Building a personal brand

Gregor was recently asked by leading law firm Harper Macleod LLP to share advice on building a personal brand for clients and employees. Here's what he had to say...

 

People buy from people.

During this time of flux, people will use this period of business interruption to reassess where and how they spend their money.

Regardless of whether or not you work for a respected company with a stellar reputation, it’s vital that the people within that organisation build their own personal brand.

Consistency

In the past, we’ve heard people claim “PR” doesn’t work because their name was mentioned in one article and it didn’t lead to an avalanche of calls, or social media doesn’t work because it didn't produce a single enquiry. These things take time and reward patience. The more you show-up and consistently deliver sustained storytelling on any platform, the more likely you are to begin to reap the rewards.

Be different

If everyone else is posting their team Zoom calls to demonstrate how they’re navigating the Covid-19 crisis, break through the white noise by doing something different. Posting what everyone else is doing is the easy thing to do, but if you think about what makes you different, what are you doing that nobody else is doing, that’s where you’ll make an impact.

Shout about success

In Scotland, we’re not very good at shouting about ourselves. If you let people know about the impact you’ve made for a client, then it’s likely there are many other people who would want a similar impact made for them. If you don’t tell them, who will? Showcase the success you’ve had and focus it on the type of work you want.

Borrow from the best

Make sure your social channels aren’t echo chambers. Cultivate a genuinely diverse group of connections across every platform and make use of any time spent scrolling by taking note of what resonates with you. How can you then tweak that in order to speak to your growing audience?

Don’t be constrained to one platform

If your competitors are on LinkedIn, you should be on that channel, but the blend between work and life has never been more obvious than on social media. If you promote your personal brand across the social media landscape you will tap into different audiences and showcase different elements of your personality on each platform.

Add value

Your expertise is hugely valuable. For example, I’m not a lawyer, so the most simple pieces of legal advice will be valuable to me. When I then need a lawyer, I’m more likely to want to pay back the person who provided free, digestible advice on their channels. Become the go-to voice in your area by sharing your expertise on social media and by cultivating a network of journalists who will come to you for comment when they need expertise in your area.

Demonstrate your values

When you buy from someone who doesn’t represent your values, it causes friction. Showcase your values through the voluntary work you do, the clients you work with and your tone of voice. Think of your ideal client. That will say a lot about the values you already hold dear. Keep that dream client in mind with every decision you make and remain authentic above all else.

Be authentic

Your line of work may be viewed with a certain stereotype (don’t shoot the messenger, PR certainly is …). Let your authenticity shine through. If you're warm, be warm, if you’re funny, be funny. Don’t be what you feel you should be. If you’re not funny, don’t try to be. It will cause friction. Be yourself and have faith that your authentic self is what people will want.

Five simple things you can do today:

  1. Just as you would if you were starting a company, determine your personal mission, values and purpose.
  2. Objectively look through your last year of posts on social media and ask yourself honestly, would I buy from this person?
  3. Create a spider diagram and break down all the issues on which you can speak with authority then match them up to topics currently in the news agenda.
  4. Look at someone you view as a competitor and analyse their public platforms. What can you learn from them and where is the opportunity?
  5. Spend half an hour scrolling through all your social channels. Take a note of anything that makes you stop and think and then break it down into themes.

 

After you do all that, you’ll have the basis of a strategy for designing your own personal brand.